Second Life: The Explosion of the Resale Market and Why It’s So Crucial

Leave a comment

How often do you clean out your closet? Letting go of a bag filled with clothing every season might seem like it’s not a huge deal, but keep in mind that almost every person on the planet does just the same. In fact, research shows that the average person in America throws away an estimated 37 kilograms of clothing each year

While trying to keep up with fast fashion by tossing out old items, we tend to forget that the Earth is the one who bears all the weight and suffers the most. Thankfully, the explosion of the resale market has gifted the planet with some breathing space. 

Through the resale market, clothing is given a second life. Most importantly, sustainability becomes a byproduct. 

Let’s take a deep dive into the resale clothing industry and why it has become a crucial factor in sustainable living. 


The Alarming Statistics

To gain a full understanding of how the resale market is saving the planet, we need to take a look at the statistics that define the Earth’s current state. These are some of the alarming numbers we need to face in order to realize the need for more sustainable fashion:


An aerial view of landfill waste


The Implications of Fast Fashion 

Following new trends and keeping up with fast fashion impacts the planet in ways you would never even imagine, including:

  • Landfills choking on textile waste
  • The depletion of water resources 
  • Marine and water pollution caused by microplastics and textile dyes
  • Carbon emissions contributing to climate change
  • Child labour and inhumane working conditions

 

For a more in-depth look at the detrimental implications of fast fashion on the planet, check out this blog.  


The Rising Popularity of the Resale Market 

In 2020 alone, there were a total of 36.2 million people who decided to sell their secondhand clothing online for the first time, bringing the overall total up to 52.6 million. 

As society becomes aware about the implications of fast fashion, other, more eco-conscious trends have emerged – such as the resale market. Sustainable consumer decisions are now at the forefront of the fashion industry; in fact, 45% of millennials and gen-Z refuse to buy from brands and retailers that are non-sustainable. 

By donating clothing, you’re making way for a cycle of more sustainable fashion choices. What might no longer be usable to you could be a steal deal for someone else. Ultimately, the resale of clothing allows you to give these items a new home and a second liferather than just a spot on the towering mountains of existing landfills. 

This is the one trend that doesn’t seem to be slowing down. As of 2021, the resale market is valued at $15 billion, and is expected to hit $47 billion by 2025


The Thriving Resale Market: A Pandemic Side Effect 

While the pandemic has brought about countless negative side effects, a silver lining that we’ve come to see is the thriving resale market that has brought us closer to our goal of sustainability. 

A popular habit that has developed since the onset of the pandemic is thrifting. For some consumers, the reason behind developing this habit might be the need to be more budget-friendly amidst an unemployment crisis. While for others, it has stemmed from developing a deeper concern for the overall well-being of the planet during the pandemic. 

In 2020, a total of 33 million consumers bought secondhand apparel for the first time. The amount of resale is projected to accelerate even more in a post-COVID world – over 5.4 times in the next five years.  


How the Resale Market Is Saving the Planet  

The explosion of the resale market is working to keep wearable clothing out of landfills, reduce the overall carbon footprint, and as an added perk – it’s budget-friendly. 

To give you an idea of how big of a difference resale clothing makes, here are some of the incredible statistics from the past decade:

  • 6.65 billion items have been recirculated courtesy of the resale market. 
  • 116 billion pounds of CO2 has been displaced due to people purchasing used items instead of new. 

If society is able to keep it up, it could enable the fashion industry to cut around 143 million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. 

A person shopping at a thrift store


The Resale Market: A Planet-Saving Trend 

The resale market is a planet-saving trend that we truly hope will never go out of style. When you decide to buy something used over something new, or choose to sell your secondhand clothes instead of tossing them out, you allow the Earth to breathe a little more. When the space we live in is well and healthy, everyone wins. 

Sustainable fashion comes in various forms. Whether it’s resale clothing or eco-friendly brands, the options are endless. 

One of the best ways to achieve sustainability in fashion is by investing in timeless pieces that can transcend the trends. At BEDI, we offer consumers a chance to contribute positively to the environment by purchasing pieces that will never end up in a landfill. With our Second Life initiative, all products are refurbished to new conditions and are guaranteed to Last Beyond You

read more

  1. One Man's Trash is Another Man's Raw Materials

    One Man's Trash is Another Man's Raw Materials
    As humans, we are the sole species craving newness and innovation. Unfortunately, while this trait lead us to create the civilized societies we liv...
  2. Plastic Free July

    Plastic Free July
    “It’s not a world without plastic, it’s a world without plastic waste” -Rebecca Prince-Ruiz, Plastic Free July Founder You may have noticed more r...
  3. Zippers: The most underrated man-made invention of all time

    Zippers: The most underrated man-made invention of all time
    Zippers are probably one of the most used inventions of all time. When you think about it, you probably always have one on you - from your pants, p...
  4. Inspiration: Trailblazer Jane Goodall

    Inspiration: Trailblazer Jane Goodall
    Jane Goodall is one of the world's most celebrated primatologists, conservationists, and advocates for animal rights. Born in London, England in 19...
  5. Seatbelts: BEDI’s Secret Sauce

    Seatbelts: BEDI’s Secret Sauce
    It’s no secret that the automotive industry creates a lot of waste. We often associate this waste with the pollution caused by driving, and less wi...
  6. Cotton in the Circular Economy: Knits Made in Canada

    Cotton in the Circular Economy: Knits Made in Canada
    Cotton in the Circular Economy: Knits Made in Canada Cotton has been one of the most important fabrics used by humankind for thousands of years. It...
  7. Deadstock

    Deadstock
    Also known as “overstock”, “surplus fabric/inventory”. Any excess or leftover materials that can't be used for their original purpose or order fulf...
  8. What Goes Up Does Not Always Come Down

    What Goes Up Does Not Always Come Down
    When it comes to our concern for climate action and a push for zero waste, the sky is not the limit. Our last two articles have been about global c...
  9. The Heart of our Planet

    The Heart of our Planet
    The Ocean is the heart of the planet. Water covers more than two-thirds of the Earth's surface. Sea plants, like Posidonia, produce 70% of the oxyg...
  10. World Environment Day: Only one Earth

    World Environment Day: Only one Earth
    World Environment Day is the biggest international day to celebrate and inspire positive change for the environment. It takes place on the 5th of J...
  11. The Alchemy of Econyl

    The Alchemy of Econyl
    Technology today has allowed for the innovation of mind boggling advances in the world of manufacturing textiles, especially from a sustainability ...
  12. Repair and Rewear: The Rise of the DIY Culture in Fashion

    Repair and Rewear: The Rise of the DIY Culture in Fashion
    There is a fascinating shift that has taken place in the last few years in the way that the world is looking at consumerism. With inflation at an a...
  13. Work-Life Balance and Zooming in your Pyjamas

    Work-Life Balance and Zooming in your Pyjamas
    We can all agree that, for better or worse, the last two years have changed the way we work. Many of us now work from home, which comes with many b...
  14. The 5 most sustainable cities and tastiest tap water in the world

    The 5 most sustainable cities and tastiest tap water in the world
    As we wade back into the world of travelling and borders have opened up for tourists around the world, we wanted to explore some of the most sustai...
  15. Local Production: Now more than Ever

    Local Production: Now more than Ever
      Shopping locally whether for food, clothing or home decor, has been a growing trend which has had positive results on our environment and local c...
  16. Minimalism: design and sustainability to lifestyle

    Minimalism: design and sustainability to lifestyle
     “Less is more” Minimalism is used to describe a lifestyle in which individuals strive to only purchase items that have a real purpose and utility....
  17. Top 5 Transitional Weather Pieces to Invest In

    Top 5 Transitional Weather Pieces to Invest In
    Ushering in new seasons shouldn’t automatically mean shopping for the latest fast fashion pieces, although current advertising and marketing strate...
  18. 5 Detrimental Implications of Fast Fashion

    5 Detrimental Implications of Fast Fashion
    Hip, trendy, and cheap. Some may argue that the fast fashion industry has democratized popular high-street clothing brands through innovation and m...
  19. How To Build An Eco-Friendly Capsule Wardrobe

    How To Build An Eco-Friendly Capsule Wardrobe
    Does it feel like you own a thousand outfits but always end up with nothing to wear? So then you end up shopping for new ones that you’ll probably ...